Captain Oliver Spicer

Male 1726 - 1804  (77 years)


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  • Name Oliver Spicer  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9
    Title Captain 
    Born 28 May 1726  Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9
    Gender Male 
    Birth 28 May 1726  Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Death 11 Feb 1804  Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Died 11 Feb 1804  Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4, 7, 8, 9
    Buried Feb 1814  Capt. Abel Spicer Cemetery in Ledyard, CT Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Burial 11 Feb 1814  Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Death 11 Feb 1814  Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Residence Preston, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Residence Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Residence Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3, 4
    Notes 
    • He served in the Revolutionary War in 1776, as a Captain in the regiment under Colonel Smith, which served in the campaign around New York; in 1778, in the 8th Regiment of foot in the militia for the state of Connecticut. He was on the Payroll from April 1 to Nov 1, 1779, and also served in Colonel Gallup's regiment.

      =============
      WILL OF CAPTAIN OLIVER SPICER

      To all whom it doth or may concern be it known that I, Oliver Spicer, of Groton, in New London County, State of Connecticut being now in a comfortable state of bodily health & of sound mind, memory & understanding (Blessed be God therefor) yet only considering the ncertainty of this transitory life & certainty of death, as it is appointed to all men once to die, Do therefore make ordain & publish this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz: and first of all I commend my soul into the hands of almighty God who gave it and my body to the Earth from whence it came (to have decent and Christian burial at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named in this my will) in confident expectation that I shall receive the same again at the last day when the bodies of the just shall have a joyful resurrection to a blissful immortality through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, the only redeemer and saviour of mankind -- And as touching the worldly Goods or Estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me I do dispose hereof in manner following, viz: First to my well beloved wife, Alithea Spicer, I give and bequeath the one third part of my personal estate to be to her, her heirs and assigns forever, and also the use and improvement of one third part of my real estate during her natural life. -- Also to my two sons Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer jun'r, I give and devise all my real estate lying in the town of Groton to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever, to be equally divided between them and said Amos and Oliver in quantity & quality yet, so that in the division of my land, my Tyler and Robbin's lots (so called) shall go to said Amos Spicer in such division. Also to said sons, Amos and Oliver, I give and bequeath all my farming utensils, my carpenter's and joiner's tools, and my wearing apparel, to be equally divided between them in quantity and quality to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

      The above devises and bequests I make to my two sons Amos and Oliver Spicer on condition that they and each of them shall well and truly pay and perform the several legacies and impositions contained in this my will for them to do and perform agreeable to the true spirit intent and meaning thereof.

      Also to my grandson, Stephen Brewster, I give and bequeath thirty dollars to be paid him or his heirs and in one year after my decease, by my said two sons Amos and Oliver equally between them.

      Also to my five daughters Alithea Meech, Mary Woodward, Deborah Forsyth, Elizabeth Spicer and Lucy Gray, to each and every of them, I give and bequeath fifty pounds, lawful money value out of my personal estate, considering and accounting whatsoever they, and each of them have already received out of my personal estate for their present use severally or in part of their present legacies hereby given them as the several articles by them so severally received stand entered in a memorandum book by me kept for that purpose (and accompanying this) and at the prices therein severally stated to be delivered them severally by my exectors out of my personal estate in one year after my decease to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

      And to my granddaughter Hannah Holdredge, daughter of my daughter Jerusha Holdredge, deceased, I give and bequeath fifty pounds lawful money value, to consist of one cow and calf, one case of drawers, two tables and one stand, two beds and furniture, and such other articles of household furniture as I shall leave to be as nearly equal, as may be, in kind, quality and value, to like articles received by my other daughters, aunts to said Hannah, as stated in the account by me entered and before referred to, to be delivered to her by my executors out of my personal estate at the time of her attaining the age of eighteen years old in case of my previous decease, otherwise to be delivered to her in one year after in case she shall arrive at the age of eighteen years. And further my will is that my said granddaughter, Hannah Holdredge, shall be brought up to the age of eighteen years old at the joint expense of my said executors, Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer, and to have suitable and competent school learning, according to the custom of the country at their expense. And if said granddaughter, Hannah Holdredge, shall survive the age of eighteen years and to be then unmarried, in such case my will is that she, my said granddaughter shall have privilege in my dwelling house for the safe keeping of her goods and a comfortable personal residence therein, with privilege of fires, etc., as shall be reasonable and necessary, and liberty of summer and fall fruit in the orchards for her personal consumption during the time of her so continuing unmarried, and the above bequests are to be to her heirs and assigns forever. But in case she shall not attain to the age of eighteen years then my will is that all and whatsover of my estate is, by this will assigned to her, shall be to my five daughters viz: Alithea, Mary, Deborah, Elizabeth and Lucy, their heirs and representatives.

      And Whereas in the course of Divine Providence it may happen that I may survive one or all my children above mentioned, in such case my will is that this instrument of writing shall have its full force and effect respecting the heirs of any or all my children which I may so survive agreeable to the tone, intent and meaning thereof. It is also to be understood that I do hereby order and direct my executors duly and seasonable to pay all my just debts and funeral charges (previous to paying out any legacies) to be paid out of my personal estate, whereas I have before directed in this my will that my Tyler lot and my Robbin's lot (so called) shall go into my son Amos's division of my real estate, now my will is that if my said son Amos shall hereafter make berrerments thereon by clearing and draining the swampy ground it shall inure wholly to his own benefit and the said lands be considered on a division between him and his brother in the state in which it now is anything before written notwithstanding.

      And I do hereby nominate and appoint my said two sons Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer joint executors of this my will hereby revoking and disannulling all other and former will or wills by me heretofore made and ratifying and confirming this alone as and for my last will and testament.

      In witness whereof I set my hand and seal this 24th day of May, 1779.
      /s/ Capt. Oliver Spicer.
      Witnesses: Isaac Williams, Prentice Allyn, Amos Gere

      Codicil, February 5th, 1804. To my beloved wife, Alithea, I give and bequeath my white yearling heifer. Also to my beloved son Amos Spicer I give and bequeath my iron crow-bar; also to my two sons Amos and Oliver Spicer, I give and bequeath etc. all my books for personal or library, together with my watch and a piece of cloth suitable and sufficient to make a coat for my own body and for that purpose original intended, to be equally dived between them in quality and quantity.

      Also to my granddaughter Hannah Holdredge, I give and bequeath the several articles of household furniture designated to her in a former clause and my will now is, that said Hannah shall have the same set out to her previous to the setting out of thirds of my personal estate, as before directed, in this my Will.

      /s/ Oliver Spicer

      Witnesses: Martha Spicer, Amos Gere, Prudence Gere

      Proved May 1st 1804.
      Inventory of estate L2991 11s.
      Recorded Stonington Probate Journals, Vol. 7, Folio 184.
      [Spicer Genealogy, Meech & Meech, 1911, pgs 434-437]




      A statement of sophistication and whimsy, this Queen Anne architectural corner cupboard illustrates the divergent styles used by Connecticut cabinetmakers of the 18th century. The design of the facade is a tribute to balance and restraint, seeking sophistication with elegance and simplicity. It features the formal elements of a complex keystone and large molded cornice, conforming raised panels and an arched glass door. The interior displays the creativity and whimsy that Connecticut craftsmen were known for imbuing in their pieces. The finely crafted domed back is decorated with strings of carved vines connected to three delicately carved rosettes, two of which are supported by engaged pilasters. With the addition of butterfly shaped shelves, the interior features all the unique character that could be expected. Constructed with thorough attention to detail, this corner cupboard also has the distinction of being signed by an important Connecticut cabinetmaker. The glazed arched door features a small double pane window which holds a piece of 18th century paper, dated and signed by the maker, ``September 29th 1755, Oliver Spicer, Fecit.´´
      Oliver Spicer (1726 - 1804) was born in Groton,
      Connecticut, the son of John Spicer (1698 - 1743) and Mary Geer (1701 - ca.1730). From a well established and active family, five members of the Spicer family are known to have been woodworkers. Among them are Oliver Spicer and his two brothers, John (1724 - 1769) and Abel (1736 - 1784). The three brothers were descendants of Peter Spicer (d.1695), one of the original settlers of Groton. Peter Spicer was part of the small group who left Boston with the future Governor of Connecticut, John Winthrop, Jr., to settle on the Thames River around 1650. Oliver Spicer was married in North Groton in 1749 to Alethia Allyn, the descendant of another early settler, Robert Allyn (d. 1683).

      Additional information illustrates the deep connections between the Spicers and other Eastern Connecticut cabinetmakers. Oliver Spicer´s father, John

      Spicer, was married to Mary Geer in Groton about 1720. Mary was the sister of Ebenezer Geer (1709 - 1763), who in turn was the father of John Wheeler Geer (1753 - 1828). A first cousin to Oliver Spicer, John Wheeler Geer was a noted cabinetmaker from Preston, Connecticut. A chest on chest attributed to John Wheeler Geer is on loan to the Lyman Allen Museum and is illustrated in ``New London County Furniture,´´ Lyman Allen Museum, figure 64. Interestingly, the chest on chest features carved rosette which are quite similar to the rosettes found on the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard. A connection to another noted cabinetmaker is found through Oliver Spicer´s daughter, Mary Spicer (b.1752). In 1774, Mary was married to Abishai Woodward (1752 - 1809), also of Preston. Woodward is credited with the construction of an impressive Chippendale mahogany tall case clock in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Art and illustrated in ``New London County Furniture´´, figure 62. The clock and the connection to the Spicer family is also discussed in Antiques Magazine, June 1965, ``Thomas Harland´s clock - whose case?´´ by Ada R. Chase and Houghton Bulkeley. Continuing the connection, the base of the Woodward clock displays a five part scrolled apron similar to that which is found on the John Wheeler Geer chest on chest.



      Oliver Spicer´s name first appears in the Groton Tax Records in 1753, then again in 1763 and 1767. The sophistication and quality craftsmanship found in the corner cupboard make clear that Oliver Spicer´s career was well on its way by 1755. A roster of soldiers serving under Capt. Thomas Fanning in 1775 lists one ``Amos Park, prentice to Lieut. O. Spicer - 18´´. This note of an apprentice also illustrates the fact that Oliver Spicer´s workshop was well established by 1775. The apprentice system was an important influence on Connecticut cabinetmakers, spreading knowledge and style throughout the area. Following the close family connections, it is possible that John Wheeler Geer and Abishai Woodward apprenticed to Oliver Spicer or one of the other Spicer brothers. It is interesting to note that the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard, the John Wheeler Geer chest on chest and the Abishai Woodward clock case, all share the same type of delicately carved rosettes with a raised center.

      Following the Revolutionary War, Oliver and his brother Abel were both given the distinguished title of Captain. The first clear written record acknowledging Captain Oliver Spicer as a woodworker is found in the North Groton Tax Records for 1784. Next to his annual tax assessment his occupation is listed as ``Carpenter.´´ The terms ``carpenter´´ and ``joiner´´ are both used in the tax records to distinguish different types of cabinetmakers. The note for Oliver Spicer as ``Carpenter´´ may indicate that he was more involved in architectural construction, such as this signed corner cupboard. The term ``joiner´´ is more often used for cabinetmakers involved in furniture production. However, it is also known that upon Oliver Spicer´s death in 1804 his inventory lists $20 worth of ``Carpenters & Joiners Tools.´´

      Unfortunately, it is not known for whose home the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard was constructed. Nathan Liverant and Son recently acquired the piece from a collection formed by Julian Williams of Norwich, Connecticut. According to tradition, the corner cupboard was brought to Williams by a man who needed money for his daughter´s wedding. It is believed the cupboard was originally built for a home in the Preston or Plainfield area, not far from Oliver Spicer´s home in North Groton.
    • He served in the Revolutionary War in 1776, as a Captain in the regiment under Colonel Smith, which served in the campaign around New York; in 1778, in the 8th Regiment of foot in the militia for the state of Connecticut. He was on the Payroll from April 1 to Nov 1, 1779, and also served in Colonel Gallup's regiment.

      =============
      WILL OF CAPTAIN OLIVER SPICER

      To all whom it doth or may concern be it known that I, Oliver Spicer, of Groton, in New London County, State of Connecticut being now in a comfortable state of bodily health & of sound mind, memory & understanding (Blessed be God therefor) yet only considering the ncertainty of this transitory life & certainty of death, as it is appointed to all men once to die, Do therefore make ordain & publish this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following viz: and first of all I commend my soul into the hands of almighty God who gave it and my body to the Earth from whence it came (to have decent and Christian burial at the discretion of my executors hereinafter named in this my will) in confident expectation that I shall receive the same again at the last day when the bodies of the just shall have a joyful resurrection to a blissful immortality through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, the only redeemer and saviour of mankind -- And as touching the worldly Goods or Estate wherewith it has pleased God to bless me I do dispose hereof in manner following, viz: First to my well beloved wife, Alithea Spicer, I give and bequeath the one third part of my personal estate to be to her, her heirs and assigns forever, and also the use and improvement of one third part of my real estate during her natural life. -- Also to my two sons Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer jun'r, I give and devise all my real estate lying in the town of Groton to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever, to be equally divided between them and said Amos and Oliver in quantity & quality yet, so that in the division of my land, my Tyler and Robbin's lots (so called) shall go to said Amos Spicer in such division. Also to said sons, Amos and Oliver, I give and bequeath all my farming utensils, my carpenter's and joiner's tools, and my wearing apparel, to be equally divided between them in quantity and quality to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

      The above devises and bequests I make to my two sons Amos and Oliver Spicer on condition that they and each of them shall well and truly pay and perform the several legacies and impositions contained in this my will for them to do and perform agreeable to the true spirit intent and meaning thereof.

      Also to my grandson, Stephen Brewster, I give and bequeath thirty dollars to be paid him or his heirs and in one year after my decease, by my said two sons Amos and Oliver equally between them.

      Also to my five daughters Alithea Meech, Mary Woodward, Deborah Forsyth, Elizabeth Spicer and Lucy Gray, to each and every of them, I give and bequeath fifty pounds, lawful money value out of my personal estate, considering and accounting whatsoever they, and each of them have already received out of my personal estate for their present use severally or in part of their present legacies hereby given them as the several articles by them so severally received stand entered in a memorandum book by me kept for that purpose (and accompanying this) and at the prices therein severally stated to be delivered them severally by my exectors out of my personal estate in one year after my decease to be to them, their heirs and assigns forever.

      And to my granddaughter Hannah Holdredge, daughter of my daughter Jerusha Holdredge, deceased, I give and bequeath fifty pounds lawful money value, to consist of one cow and calf, one case of drawers, two tables and one stand, two beds and furniture, and such other articles of household furniture as I shall leave to be as nearly equal, as may be, in kind, quality and value, to like articles received by my other daughters, aunts to said Hannah, as stated in the account by me entered and before referred to, to be delivered to her by my executors out of my personal estate at the time of her attaining the age of eighteen years old in case of my previous decease, otherwise to be delivered to her in one year after in case she shall arrive at the age of eighteen years. And further my will is that my said granddaughter, Hannah Holdredge, shall be brought up to the age of eighteen years old at the joint expense of my said executors, Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer, and to have suitable and competent school learning, according to the custom of the country at their expense. And if said granddaughter, Hannah Holdredge, shall survive the age of eighteen years and to be then unmarried, in such case my will is that she, my said granddaughter shall have privilege in my dwelling house for the safe keeping of her goods and a comfortable personal residence therein, with privilege of fires, etc., as shall be reasonable and necessary, and liberty of summer and fall fruit in the orchards for her personal consumption during the time of her so continuing unmarried, and the above bequests are to be to her heirs and assigns forever. But in case she shall not attain to the age of eighteen years then my will is that all and whatsover of my estate is, by this will assigned to her, shall be to my five daughters viz: Alithea, Mary, Deborah, Elizabeth and Lucy, their heirs and representatives.

      And Whereas in the course of Divine Providence it may happen that I may survive one or all my children above mentioned, in such case my will is that this instrument of writing shall have its full force and effect respecting the heirs of any or all my children which I may so survive agreeable to the tone, intent and meaning thereof. It is also to be understood that I do hereby order and direct my executors duly and seasonable to pay all my just debts and funeral charges (previous to paying out any legacies) to be paid out of my personal estate, whereas I have before directed in this my will that my Tyler lot and my Robbin's lot (so called) shall go into my son Amos's division of my real estate, now my will is that if my said son Amos shall hereafter make berrerments thereon by clearing and draining the swampy ground it shall inure wholly to his own benefit and the said lands be considered on a division between him and his brother in the state in which it now is anything before written notwithstanding.

      And I do hereby nominate and appoint my said two sons Amos Spicer and Oliver Spicer joint executors of this my will hereby revoking and disannulling all other and former will or wills by me heretofore made and ratifying and confirming this alone as and for my last will and testament.

      In witness whereof I set my hand and seal this 24th day of May, 1779.
      /s/ Capt. Oliver Spicer.
      Witnesses: Isaac Williams, Prentice Allyn, Amos Gere

      Codicil, February 5th, 1804. To my beloved wife, Alithea, I give and bequeath my white yearling heifer. Also to my beloved son Amos Spicer I give and bequeath my iron crow-bar; also to my two sons Amos and Oliver Spicer, I give and bequeath etc. all my books for personal or library, together with my watch and a piece of cloth suitable and sufficient to make a coat for my own body and for that purpose original intended, to be equally dived between them in quality and quantity.

      Also to my granddaughter Hannah Holdredge, I give and bequeath the several articles of household furniture designated to her in a former clause and my will now is, that said Hannah shall have the same set out to her previous to the setting out of thirds of my personal estate, as before directed, in this my Will.

      /s/ Oliver Spicer

      Witnesses: Martha Spicer, Amos Gere, Prudence Gere

      Proved May 1st 1804.
      Inventory of estate L2991 11s.
      Recorded Stonington Probate Journals, Vol. 7, Folio 184.
      [Spicer Genealogy, Meech & Meech, 1911, pgs 434-437]




      A statement of sophistication and whimsy, this Queen Anne architectural corner cupboard illustrates the divergent styles used by Connecticut cabinetmakers of the 18th century. The design of the facade is a tribute to balance and restraint, seeking sophistication with elegance and simplicity. It features the formal elements of a complex keystone and large molded cornice, conforming raised panels and an arched glass door. The interior displays the creativity and whimsy that Connecticut craftsmen were known for imbuing in their pieces. The finely crafted domed back is decorated with strings of carved vines connected to three delicately carved rosettes, two of which are supported by engaged pilasters. With the addition of butterfly shaped shelves, the interior features all the unique character that could be expected. Constructed with thorough attention to detail, this corner cupboard also has the distinction of being signed by an important Connecticut cabinetmaker. The glazed arched door features a small double pane window which holds a piece of 18th century paper, dated and signed by the maker, ``September 29th 1755, Oliver Spicer, Fecit.´´
      Oliver Spicer (1726 - 1804) was born in Groton,
      Connecticut, the son of John Spicer (1698 - 1743) and Mary Geer (1701 - ca.1730). From a well established and active family, five members of the Spicer family are known to have been woodworkers. Among them are Oliver Spicer and his two brothers, John (1724 - 1769) and Abel (1736 - 1784). The three brothers were descendants of Peter Spicer (d.1695), one of the original settlers of Groton. Peter Spicer was part of the small group who left Boston with the future Governor of Connecticut, John Winthrop, Jr., to settle on the Thames River around 1650. Oliver Spicer was married in North Groton in 1749 to Alethia Allyn, the descendant of another early settler, Robert Allyn (d. 1683).

      Additional information illustrates the deep connections between the Spicers and other Eastern Connecticut cabinetmakers. Oliver Spicer´s father, John

      Spicer, was married to Mary Geer in Groton about 1720. Mary was the sister of Ebenezer Geer (1709 - 1763), who in turn was the father of John Wheeler Geer (1753 - 1828). A first cousin to Oliver Spicer, John Wheeler Geer was a noted cabinetmaker from Preston, Connecticut. A chest on chest attributed to John Wheeler Geer is on loan to the Lyman Allen Museum and is illustrated in ``New London County Furniture,´´ Lyman Allen Museum, figure 64. Interestingly, the chest on chest features carved rosette which are quite similar to the rosettes found on the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard. A connection to another noted cabinetmaker is found through Oliver Spicer´s daughter, Mary Spicer (b.1752). In 1774, Mary was married to Abishai Woodward (1752 - 1809), also of Preston. Woodward is credited with the construction of an impressive Chippendale mahogany tall case clock in the collection of the Detroit Institute of Art and illustrated in ``New London County Furniture´´, figure 62. The clock and the connection to the Spicer family is also discussed in Antiques Magazine, June 1965, ``Thomas Harland´s clock - whose case?´´ by Ada R. Chase and Houghton Bulkeley. Continuing the connection, the base of the Woodward clock displays a five part scrolled apron similar to that which is found on the John Wheeler Geer chest on chest.



      Oliver Spicer´s name first appears in the Groton Tax Records in 1753, then again in 1763 and 1767. The sophistication and quality craftsmanship found in the corner cupboard make clear that Oliver Spicer´s career was well on its way by 1755. A roster of soldiers serving under Capt. Thomas Fanning in 1775 lists one ``Amos Park, prentice to Lieut. O. Spicer - 18´´. This note of an apprentice also illustrates the fact that Oliver Spicer´s workshop was well established by 1775. The apprentice system was an important influence on Connecticut cabinetmakers, spreading knowledge and style throughout the area. Following the close family connections, it is possible that John Wheeler Geer and Abishai Woodward apprenticed to Oliver Spicer or one of the other Spicer brothers. It is interesting to note that the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard, the John Wheeler Geer chest on chest and the Abishai Woodward clock case, all share the same type of delicately carved rosettes with a raised center.

      Following the Revolutionary War, Oliver and his brother Abel were both given the distinguished title of Captain. The first clear written record acknowledging Captain Oliver Spicer as a woodworker is found in the North Groton Tax Records for 1784. Next to his annual tax assessment his occupation is listed as ``Carpenter.´´ The terms ``carpenter´´ and ``joiner´´ are both used in the tax records to distinguish different types of cabinetmakers. The note for Oliver Spicer as ``Carpenter´´ may indicate that he was more involved in architectural construction, such as this signed corner cupboard. The term ``joiner´´ is more often used for cabinetmakers involved in furniture production. However, it is also known that upon Oliver Spicer´s death in 1804 his inventory lists $20 worth of ``Carpenters & Joiners Tools.´´

      Unfortunately, it is not known for whose home the Oliver Spicer corner cupboard was constructed. Nathan Liverant and Son recently acquired the piece from a collection formed by Julian Williams of Norwich, Connecticut. According to tradition, the corner cupboard was brought to Williams by a man who needed money for his daughter´s wedding. It is believed the cupboard was originally built for a home in the Preston or Plainfield area, not far from Oliver Spicer´s home in North Groton.
    Person ID P2110  Rathkamp
    Last Modified 22 Jun 2020 

    Father John Spicer,   b. 01 Jan 1698, New London, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Aug 1753, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 55 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Mary Geer,   b. 14 May 1701, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Oct 1744, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 43 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 1720  Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Married 22 Oct 1720  Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [11, 12
    Family ID F538  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Allathea Allyn,   b. 04 Apr 1731, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Sep 1816, Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 15 Aug 1749  Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 13
    Children 
     1. Alethea Spicer,   b. 26 Feb 1749, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1816, Ulster, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)  [natural]
     2. Mary Spicer,   b. 27 Feb 1751, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 08 May 1812, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)  [natural]
     3. James Spicer,   b. 05 Dec 1753, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Nov 1828, Edgecombe, North Carolina, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 74 years)  [natural]
     4. Martha Spicer,   b. 30 Mar 1755,   d. Nov 1779, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 24 years)  [natural]
     5. Amos Spicer,   b. 20 Feb 1762, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 06 Sep 1830, Akron, Summit, Ohio, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)  [natural]
     6. Elizabeth Spicer,   b. 25 Jul 1764, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
     7. Oliver Spicer,   b. 20 Nov 1766, Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 22 Nov 1839, Preston City, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 73 years)  [natural]
     8. Lucy Spicer,   b. 02 May 1770, Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 03 Sep 1813  (Age 43 years)  [natural]
     9. Deborah Spicer,   b. 26 Apr 1771, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Feb 1801, Ledyard, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)  [natural]
     10. Jerusha Spicer,   b. 09 Jul 1774, Groton, New London, Connecticut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 May 1799  (Age 24 years)  [natural]
    Last Modified 22 Jun 2020 
    Family ID F537  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Histories
    Captain Oliver Spicer
    Captain Oliver Spicer

  • Sources 
    1. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for Alethea Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=2110

    2. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for John Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=2110

    3. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for Oliver Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=2110

    4. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for Alathea Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=2110

    5. [S-1441901416] Connecticut Town Birth Records, pre-1870 (Barbour Collection), Ancestry.com, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc), Database online.
      Record for Oliver Spicer

    6. [S156071611] American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI), Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), Database online.
      Record for Oliver Spicer

    7. [S151390531] U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970, Ancestry.com, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), Volume: 320.

    8. [S151390585] North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000, Ancestry.com, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), Book Title: Lineage Book : NSDAR : Volume 143 : 1918-1919.

    9. [S151390601] U.S., Craftperson Files, 1600-1995, Ancestry.com, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.).

    10. [S-1258786898] U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900, Yates Publishing, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc), Database online. Source number: 388.000; Source type: Electronic Database; Number of Pages: 1; Submitter Code: MHH.
      Record for John Spicer

    11. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for John Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=1992

    12. [S151390585] North America, Family Histories, 1500-2000, Ancestry.com, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.), Book Title: Tyler Genealogy. Descendants of Job Tyler.

    13. [S156071572] Ancestry Family Trees, (Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members.), Database online.
      Record for Oliver Spicer
      http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=0&pid=1992